A handy chart for all steak lovers. Which cuts come from where etc.


We agree. Aussie too. Have you ever discovered tip that is tri oz? Or understand what it is called right here? It is often called Culotte Steak, or Bottom Sirloin We wonder when there is one for pork ...



This image with the title of "A handy chart for all steak lovers. Which cuts come from where etc." is one of a large collection of pictures from the category Steak . We collect quality images, from a social network website reddit.com

Source: To view the original source also read the full comments of the original poster as well as from other redditor, you can click on the following Link.

Some random comments on reddit about A handy chart for all steak lovers. Which cuts come from where etc.

  • I agree. Aussie too. Have you ever found tri tip on oz? Or know what it's called here?
  • It's sometimes called Culotte Steak, or Bottom Sirloin
  • I wonder if there is one for pork too.
  • I'm sure there is, but pork is a lot simpler than beef. The stuff in the middle is sort of similar, you've got rib chops, similar to ribeyes, center cut chops, similar to a t-bone/kansas city strip or a N.Y. strip if you're talking boneless, then the loin chops, similar to a porterhouse, with the fatter part of the tenderloin on it. There is a pork sirloin, but having never cut bone in beef sirloin I can't tell you how similar they are. It certainly looks different, but there is a pretty big size difference between the two. The big differences are at the ends. The back end of a pig is a ham, I've never seen it broken down further. That's not to say that no one does it, but it's pretty uncommon to see a cut from that are that isn't ham. The front end is the boston butt, on top of the shoulder, then the pork shoulder, then the picnic ham. Again, not a lot of breaking down there. You can cut a boston butt into pork steaks or bone in country ribs, but there isn't much done with the shoulder, which sits right below that, or picnic ham, which is lower still, and often just sold whole. There's some odds and ends with pork as well, you can make country style ribs out of either the boston butt or the first bit of the rib end of a loin. Boneless country style ribs generally come from the rib end of a boneless loin. Of course, the best part of a pig is the belly, which gets turned into bacon, or sometimes just sold raw.
  • Yeah I know pork is simpler to cook, I just like charts lol. Plus this one is neat looking and would look cool printed out on nice paper and hanging in my kitchen.
  • Read more comments


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *